Native Artist Series —Artist Conversation: Native North American Art Now

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Three connected panels of art installed around the interior corner of a gallery. They combine stylized classical images with modern technology like cameras and a jeep, with a hybrid english/latin text overlay.
Andrea Carlson, Three works from the VORE Series, installation view, 2017. Courtesy of the artist © Andrea Carlson

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Andrea Carlson (image provided)

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Candice Hopkins (Image provided)

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Naomi Bebo, Woodland Child in Gas Mask, 2015. Mixed Media. Photo by Jason S. Ordaz, Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA). Courtesy of the artist ©️ Naomi Bebo
Naomi Bebo, Woodland Child in Gas Mask, 2015. Mixed Media. Photo by Jason S. Ordaz, Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA). Courtesy of the artist ©️ Naomi Bebo
Talk
Mar 5, 2020 - 5:30 pm
Lower Level, Auditorium (KAM 62)
Co-sponsored by the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, School of Art + Design Visitors Committee, and Frances P. Rohlen Visiting Artist Fund/College of Fine and Applied Arts. The Native Artist Series is produced in partnership with American Indian Studies, Native American House, the School of Art + Design, and the School of Music. Paid for by the Student Cultural Programming Fee.

Join us for a conversation about contemporary scholarly, artistic, and curatorial practice — featuring exhibiting artist Naomi Bebo (Menominee an Ho-Chunk Nations), artist Andrea Carlson (Ojibwe Nation), and curator Candice Hopkins (Tlingit Nation).

Co-moderated by Jenny Davis, Chancellor's Fellow of Indigenous Research and Ethics and Assistant Professor of Anthropology and American Indian Studies; and Amy L. Powell, curator of Modern and Contemporary Art

 

About the Native Artist Series

Initiated in 2020, the KAM Native Artist series connects contemporary Native artists and their practice to KAM exhibitions, collections, and research and dovetails with curricula for undergraduate and graduate students across campus. The series offers public lectures, performances, and sustain engagement with students through studio visits, classroom workshops, and informal conversations at Native American House, American Indian Studies, and the museum. The series is designed for critical reflection and will present a vibrant and complex set of discussions around contemporary Native American visual culture.