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Sandra Batzli, Out the Window. Watercolor, 24.5 in. x 19.5 in. Courtesy of the artist.
Sandra Batzli, Out the Window. Watercolor, 24.5 in. x 19.5 in. Courtesy of the artist.

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Patrick Harness, Farm O'Lantern. Pastel on rag paper, 19 in. x 23 in. Courtesy of the artist.
Patrick Harness, Farm O'Lantern. Pastel on rag paper, 19 in. x 23 in. Courtesy of the artist.

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Patrick Harness, Bedeviled. Giclée from an original photo, 17 in. x 19 in. Courtesy of the artist.
Patrick Harness, Bedeviled. Giclée from an original photo, 17 in. x 19 in. Courtesy of the artist.

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Diane Schumacher, Fleur. Colored pencil, 15.5 in. x 12 in. Courtesy of the artist.
Diane Schumacher, Fleur. Colored pencil, 15.5 in. x 12 in. Courtesy of the artist.

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Birute Simaitis, Rural Route 1. Giclée, 14.5 in. x 19.25 in. Courtesy of the artist.
Birute Simaitis, Rural Route 1. Giclée, 14.5 in. x 19.25 in. Courtesy of the artist.

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David Moore Smith, Silvan Sunrise. Acrylic on canvas board. 15.5 in. x 13/5 in. Courtesy of the artist.
David Moore Smith, Silvan Sunrise. Acrylic on canvas board. 15.5 in. x 13/5 in. Courtesy of the artist.

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Bonnie Switzer, Sunset. Watercolor, 15 in. x 20.5 in. Courtesy of the artist.
Bonnie Switzer, Sunset. Watercolor, 15 in. x 20.5 in. Courtesy of the artist.
Apr 5, 2019 - 12–4 pm
Apr 6, 2019 - 10 am–4 pm
Main Level, Lobby
Sponsored by the Krannert Art Museum Council

Join us for this special Illinois Moms' Weekend event sponsored by the Krannert Art Museum Council.

After a one-year hiatus, the KAM Council Board is excited to bring back our very popular Art Raffle.

When the museum is open during Moms Weekend, these original works of art will be set up in the lobby to view, and raffle tickets will be available for sale ($5 each or 5 for $20). Proceeds from this raffle will be used for future KAM Council programs.

We are especially excited this year because we have seven talented artists participating. So stop by the museum for a chance to win of these wonderful works of art. Scroll through the top slideshow to many of them.

Artist Statements

Sandra Batzli

As a graduate in Art Education from the University of Minnesota, I was instructed in a variety of art media. I taught art in art museums and both public and private schools in Minnesota and California.

My husband’s work took our family to Barrow, Alaska (where I painted watercolors of 58 tundra plants), and to Lower Hutt, New Zealand (where I learned to spin and weave wool). Before moving to Urbana in 1971, I was a production potter in Davis, California.

My interest in art education continued here where I have benefited personally by studying various pieces in the Krannert Art Museum’s permanent collection and by viewing their special exhibits. Since 1990, I have focused on and been inspired to paint watercolors of both the manmade and natural phenomena found in the ever-changing Midwest environment.

I exhibit locally with Artisans 10+, a group I helped found, and maintain a home/studio in Urbana.

 

Patrick Harness

Patrick Harness was born in Mobile, Alabama. He has since resided in Western Australia, Oregon and Brooklyn, New York where he attended Pratt Institute. His images are a result of 35 years of experimenting with a variety of media, with a focus on pastel and oil painting. He has happily resided in central Illinois since 1977 where he enjoys the company of his family, friends and the unique beauty of its rural landscape.

Patrick says: I use a multiple layering technique with both the pastels and oil paintings. By allotting a passage of time between each layer, I allow the piece to "tell" me what is needed next. I also enjoy focusing on the implied movement of each subject, to reflect the passage of time.

 

Diane Schumacher

Diane received her undergraduate degree in art education from the University of Illinois and her graduate degree in interior design from Indiana University. In the past, she has taught art in the public school system and has worked as a freelance designer.

She retired in 2014, after working 23 years at Krannert Art Museum. At that time, she began taking watercolor classes with Margaret DeCardy, an accomplished artist who during her career has created magnificent watercolors.

 

Birute Simaitis

At age eight, I emigrated to America with my parents and three siblings on the USS General Howze, one of the US Navy Transport Ships that were used to transport refugees at the end of WW II. We were fortunate to be in the American Zone of Germany, and fortunate to find a kind family in Missouri to sponsor us.                          

We eventually settled in Chicago in a Lithuanian neighborhood. As far as I can remember, art has somehow been a part of my life. My mother guided me when I made my childish drawings. My first visit to the Art Institute of Chicago was at age 14. That visit became an inspiration, and the Art Institute a regular haunt. However, my education was in Medical Technology and I worked at Michael Reese Hospital in Chicago until I married Vaidas Simaitis and followed him to the University of Illinois.       

Several years after moving to Champaign/Urbana in 1971, I discovered Parkland College, which at that time did not have a permanent location. Due to its wonderful art program and expanding campus, I was able to fill my free time with graphic design, art history, visiting museums, and especially the joy of painting.  I enjoy visiting museums in our travels, but am especially drawn to street artists, outdoor art shows, and small exhibits.

 

Vaidas Simaitis

While sipping Cappuccino at the entrance to Nordstrom in Chicago, waiting for Birute to finish shopping, I started to doodle on a napkin and ended up drawing an octagon. I added triangular points on the outside -- it looked a lot more interesting. Before retiring from the Physics Department at the University of Illinois, much of my work was designing parts in three dimensions, and I tried to imagine what this may look like extended to 3D. Birute came out – no shoes - it was time to go, and I forgot about it.

Back in Urbana, several months later, the image kept coming back. I thought it would be a great challenge to see if I could actually make it somehow. Having a workshop in the back corner of our lot, I decided to try it. Since this would definitely involve power tools and I still needed all my fingers, I started with soft wood (redwood) and very large so I could keep by fingers far from the blade. Eventually I succeeded, but decided it was much too big, and started making much smaller ones, and then larger ones from 1-5/32" wood boards. I started removing wood with cut out holes, and then cut out slots.  This is one of the results, made from wood, glue, and gold glitter paint.

If you need to know the technical name of this polyhedron, you’ll have to learn to say: Slotted Augmented ‘Rhombicuboctahedron’. Or ‘RCO’ for short.

 

David Moore Smith

David Moore Smith has touched the lives of millions worldwide since earning his degree in visual design from Purdue University. 

He began his career as a set and prop designer for Mr. Roger’s Neighborhood at WQED in Pittsburgh in 1971. His work is seen in such designs as the puppet, Harriet Elizabeth Cow, and the Neighborhood model used in the opening and closing credits of the show. 

David is now a full time artist who has lived, painted, and exhibited his work around the globe.

 

Bonnie Switzer

If there is a unifying characteristic of my art, it is to be found in my love of vibrant color and for the wonderful effects that occur-- usually planned, but sometimes not--when the paint flows onto paper.  I paint in both realistic and nonrepresentational styles.  When I paint real objects or landscapes, I am drawn to scenes of intense color, warmth, and peacefulness.  

My works are painterly.   I don’t strive for tight, photographic precision. In abstract paintings I am completely free to explore color, shape, rhythm and design without the need to represent a scene or object. I also make original, one-of-a-kind art cards, which are well known in the Champaign-Urbana area.  

I have been painting since 1990 and have taken art classes at the University of Illinois and Parkland College.  In 2002, I earned an Associate degree in Fine Arts from Parkland College.  In addition, I’ve also taken numerous art workshops from well-known water media artists around the country.  I won an award in the Watercolor USA national competition in 2018 and was named to Watercolor USA Honor Society.                                                                                                                                                 

The Cinema Gallery in Urbana displays and sells my art. 

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Carolee Schneemann (United States, 1939–2019), Water Light/Water Needle V, 1966–2014. Hand colored giclée print on Hahnemüle paper. Museum purchase in honor of Kathleen Harleman. 2017-17-1
Carolee Schneemann (United States, 1939–2019), Water Light/Water Needle V, 1966–2014. Hand colored giclée print on Hahnemüle paper. Museum purchase in honor of Kathleen Harleman through funds provided by Krannert Art Museum Council, Michael Andrechak and Kathryn Seybert, Marc and Fran Ansel, John L. and Kathleen M. Bennett, David and Beth Chasco, College of Fine and Applied Arts, Mary Kay Dailey, M. Elen Deming, Ed and Kathy Feser, Peter and Kim Fox, Kevin Hamilton, Terence and Sharon Harkness, H. Clifford and Jane Trishman Heaton, Richard and Gloria Helfrich, Peter and Joan Hood, Nancy Johnson and Ken Bengoechea, John and Lizbeth Katsinas, Julia Nucci Kelly, Debbie Kemphues, Patricia K. Knowles, Brandon Polite and Katie Koca Polite, Abe and Lisa Kocheril, Wynne Korr, Len Lewicki, Jeffrey and Gayle Magee, Nishant Makhijani, Rebecca McBride and Betsy Bachmann, Melissa Merli, Alan T. Mette, Thom and Martha Moore, David and Nancy Morse, Peter Mortensen, Wally and Jane Myers, Dann and Brenda Nardi, Richard and Rosann Noel, Mary Ellen O’Shaughnessey, Dan and Mary Ellen Peterson, Anthony Petullo Foundation, M. Alice Pfeffer, Gary and Fraeda Porton, Jim and Amy Powell, Eileen Prillaman, Allyson Purpura, Brian and Gloria Rainer, Paul and Yvonne Redman, Mike and Taya Ross, Julie Rundell, Anne Sautman and George Antonakos, Cheryl Snyder and Melissa Breen, Bob and Bonnie Switzer, Ed and Nancy Tepper, Joy Thornton-Walter and John Walter, Ella Van Wyk, Maureen Warren and Allison Hansen, Barbara Wilson, and anonymous donors. 2017-17-1
Carolee Schneemann (United States, 1939–2019)
1966–2014

47 1/2 x 34 1/2 in. (121 x 88 cm.)

This painted photographic print is a unique artifact from Carolee Schneemann’s performance of Water Light / Water Needle in March 1966 at St. Mark’s Church on the Bowery in New York’s East Village.

Inspired by the spatial dimensions of Venice, where the artist had spent time the previous year after her presentation of Meat Joy in Europe, Water Light / Water Needle relied on physical collaboration, with performers balanced on a series of ropes and pulleys mounted across a space covered with material mimicking the water of Venetian canals and with plastic bags overhead resembling clouds.

Attendees at St. Mark’s described the performers’ movements as animal-like, which indicates Schneemann’s careful research in animal communication. Her attention to movement studies and her instructions to the performers reflect the importance Schneemann placed on investigating structural forms that, when reorganized by “shifting the predictable perceptual base,” can alter the very foundations of society.

Water Light / Water Needle V bridges the challenges and promises of including performance in museum collections. It is an artifact from the live event by reproducing a photograph Schneemann selected for its depiction of the ropes that crossed the space—and the space of the visual image—to create a sense of tension that her performers carefully negotiated. Printed in 2014, Schneemann brought her skill and hand as a painter, outlining the photographic traces with vibrant emphasis.

The acquisition of this work in 2017 was made in honor of Director Emerita Kathleen Harleman, who co-organized the 2012 retrospective exhibition Carolee Schneemann: Within and Beyond the Premises with Elizabeth Brown.

An artist profile, containing essays by Harleman and Brown, is available here: Carolee Schneemann Artist Profile

 

About the Artist

Carolee Schneemann (United States, 1939–2019) trained as a painter at the University of Illinois, where she graduated with an MFA in 1962. Schneemann’s paintings, multidisciplinary collaborative performances, experimental videos, and film installations have made substantial contributions to the history of contemporary art.

Schneemann is particularly well known for being among the first artists to use her body as a medium to question cultural gender biases about artistic and creative identity, challenging dominant interpretations of feminine sexuality and influencing scores of artists in subsequent decades.

Schneemann co-founded Judson Dance Theater, where she and artists and choreographers including Yvonne Rainer, Trisha Brown, Deborah Hay, Fred Herko, Robert Morris, and Robert Rauschenberg innovated the avant-garde scene in downtown New York in the 1960s and 1970s with dance, performances, and exhibitions.

Schneemann’s work is in the collections of The Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Hammer Museum at UCLA, the Detroit Institute of Art, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, among many other institutions. The Museum der Moderne in Salzburg organized a career-spanning retrospective in 2015, which traveled to MoMA PS1 in 2017. Schneemann was awarded the Golden Lion for lifetime achievement at the Venice Biennale in 2017, the highest award granted to a living artist.

 

Author: Amy L. Powell, curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, 2019.


 

References

Sabine Breitwieser, ed. Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting. Salzburg: Museum der Moderne with Prestel, 2015.

Carolee Schneemann, Up To and Including Her Limits. New York: New Museum of Contemporary Art, 1996.

Carolee Schneemann and Brian Wallace, Carolee Schneemann: Within and Beyond the Premises. New Paltz, NY: Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art, 2010.

Carolee Schneemann, Carolee Schneemann: Unforgivable. London: Black Dog Publishing Limited, 2015.