Pressing Issues: Printmaking as Social Justice in 1930s United States (Virtual Exhibition)

Kent_1943-4-210.jpg

Florence Kent, Jewish Refugees, 1935–1943. Lithograph. Allocated by the US Government, Commissioned through the New Deal art projects, 1943-4-210.
Florence Kent, Jewish Refugees, 1935–1943. Lithograph. Allocated by the US Government, Commissioned through the New Deal art projects, 1943-4-210.

Abelman_1943-4-1.jpg

Ida Abelman, My Father Reminisces, 1937. Lithograph. Allocated by the US Government, Commissioned through the New Deal art projects, 1943-4-1.
Ida Abelman, My Father Reminisces, 1937. Lithograph. Allocated by the US Government, Commissioned through the New Deal art projects, 1943-4-1.

LaMore_1943-4-231.jpg

Chet La More, Civilians, ca. 1937. Lithograph. Allocated by the US Government, Commissioned through the New Deal art projects, 1943-4-231.
Chet La More, Civilians, ca. 1937. Lithograph. Allocated by the US Government, Commissioned through the New Deal art projects, 1943-4-231.

Exhibition

On view
Oct 3, 2020
Main Level, West Gallery and Light Court

Pressing Issues brings together work by artists in the 1930s United States who, through their art, produced radical, critical commentaries on the social injustices plaguing the country at that time.

Relying primarily on rarely-displayed Works Progress Administration/Federal Art Project (WPA/FAP) prints in KAM’s strong collection of twentieth century works on paper, the exhibition will include approximately 40 works organized into themes of labor unrest (exploitation, economic disparity, and gender inequalities), discrimination and racial violence, and reactions to the rise of fascism. Pressing Issues is especially timely in that it connects this past to the present, as the current political climate in the United States is revisiting similar themes of isolationism and nationalism, populism and fascism, and racial violence.

Pressing Issues will be on view leading up to the 2020 presidential election. Given the social and economic upheaval experienced in the United States in the last decade, including the revival of fascist ideologies and the refugee crisis in America, this exhibition provides a visceral and much needed reminder of how visual artists call attention to and combat various forms of oppression. 

Curated by Kathryn Koca Polite

Sponsored in part by the International Fine Print Dealers Association, the Wyeth Foundation for American Art, and the College of Fine and Applied Arts.

 

Portfolio: Pressing Issues: Printmaking as Social Justice in 1930s United States [Exhibition]

Pressing Issues brings together work by artists in the 1930s United States who, through their art, produced radical, critical commentaries on the social injustices plaguing the country at that time. Curator: Katie Koca Polite, Fall 2020.

Records 1 to 35 of 35

Civilians

lithograph on paper
Nana

etching and aquatint, soft-ground
Strikebreakers

etching with green tint
Refugees

lithograph on paper
Children

lithograph on paper
Coming Home

linocut on mulberry paper chine collé onto rag paper
Records 1 to 35 of 35

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Kinkead Pavilion entrance photographed at sunset. Hive, two lighted sculptures, fill the space symmetrically. Each is pink with a conical structure built of stacked inflated orbs with a long braid that reaches ceiling to floor.
  1. Jan 30, 2020 to May 16, 2021
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Image of a gallery with home furnishings, colored lights, and a painted "Art Studio" sign. Two Black women sit a table beneath the sign to welcome young people to the gallery for studio art days.
  1. Aug 27, 2020 to Jul 3, 2021
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gallery view of entry wall of Art Since 1948 with the exhibition title text and art from the museum's modern and contemporary collection.
  1. Oct 3, 2020 to Aug 26, 2021
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Hand colored photograph of a young girl looking at the camera. The background is a deep blue with shades of lighter color. The girl's face is serious.
  1. Nov 5, 2020 to Mar 6, 2021